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Club Executives & Directors
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motorcyling_rotarians_eclub
 
@motorcycl_eclub
 
 
Membership Information
A couple of updates for both our current members and new incoming members!
 
For existing IFMR-NA Members:  For current members paying annual renewal dues, please respond to the invoice that is sent to you. You will be taken to the login screen as you must be logged in to pay your renewal dues. Alternatively, you can also log in to your account to check your account statement and balance listed under "My ClubRunner" and the last item on that list is "My Billing Account Balance".
 
For NEW IFMR-NA Members ONLY:  Click on "JOIN IFMR-NA!"  in the menu bar above that will take you to the NEW Member information page.  Or you can also click here to go directly to the new membership form.
 
Upcoming IFMR Rides!
IFMR-NA Friendship Ride to End Polio
Johnson City, Tennessee 
29th and 30th of May 2020  
Ride routes are still being evaluated,
but routes will most certainly contain “The Snake.”  
 
See more info about "The Snake" here: https://tinyurl.com/y6axo94g
 
 
 

Lodging - Fairfield Inn 

3078 Hamilton Place 

Johnson City, TN 37604. 

Call (423) 900-8640 to make a reservation and

Mention IFMR for a special rate. 

If we can book 15 rooms, the rate will be $106 plus tax (this rate will also apply to May 28th). 

If less than 15 rooms are booked the rate will be $144. 

The block will be held until April 28, 2020. 

Cancellations up to 7 days prior will have no penalty 

cancelations with less than 7 days remaining will be charged one day of rent and taxes. 

A credit card will be necessary to hold the reservation & Marriott Rewards number would be handy  

 

Ride Registration will be a $100 dollar donation

checks payable to Polio Plus. 

Please include your Rotary International membership number on your check to ensure proper credit is given. 

 

Riders will have the option of following a ride leader, or directions will be provided for more spirited riders. 

 

There will be social events,

a trivia competition,

rally style awards (longest distance, oldest rider, youngest rider, most eventful trip, Motorcycle Genius Award),

fellowship, and dining out.

 

For more information, suggestions, or questions contact Jim Dodmead by clicking here

 

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN - CLICK HERE to Register now!

 

 


 
July 16, 2020
The day starts at the Fairfield Inn at the Wisconsin Dells
511 Wisconsin Dells Parkway
Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
(608) 678-2676
 
Today's ride will take you to Richland Center, Prairie du Chien and end the day in Marquette, Iowa
at the Cobblestone Inn
100 North Street
Marquette, Iowa
(563) 873-8900
 
July 17
We will ride from Marquette, Iowa back to the Wisconsin Dells
via Lansing, MN; Viroqua, WI; Westby, WI; Cashton, WI; Hillsboro, WI; Reedsburg, WI
and finish up back at the Fairfield Inn at the Wisconsin Dells.
 
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
 
Questions? Send an email to Jim Lawrence, ride coordinator 

 
President Doug Cole, of the Australian Chapter has had a Committee earnestly working on a new Australian International Ride.

Today we are commencing advertising of our 'AIR2020' International Ride, for October 2020.

Numbers are not limited at the moment, but I consider we should employ the theory of ' first come, best dressed'.  We had 57 participants to the Nov 2017 'AIR17 International Ride.

We plan for AIR2020 to be bigger and better than AIR17, we have filtered all the Feedback from AIR17 and we hope to improve the Ride and supply all the issues the International and Australian Members have requested.
 
Check out the video by clicking here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Download the FLYER and the MAP
 

 
 
 

 

With sand-covered tombs, austere pyramids and towering Pharaonic temples, Egypt brings out the explorer in all of us. Egypt is rich with temples, soaring lotus-bud columns; enormous stone portals laced with delicate carvings, elaborate underground tombs, windswept desert monasteries, and richly decorated mosques. But as extraordinary as these sights are, they will probably not be the things that linger in your memory after you return home. It is exploring them from the back of a motorcycle or a scooter - from the Mediterranean feel of Alexandria to the electric pace of Cairo to the timelessness of desert villages- that is unforgettable.

 

Cross Egypt Challenge adventure rally not only gives you the opportunity to explore this magnificent country on two wheels, but it also allows you to experience the Egyptian culture first hand and explore destinations and routes that normal tourists don't get to explore.

 

Cross Egypt Challenge is a series of endurance cross-country motorcycles and scooter rallies conducted through the toughest tracks and roads of Egypt. The series is aiming to promote Egyptian tourism and is running under the supervision of the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and the Egyptian Tourism Authority.

 

For more information and to register click here


 

 

Enjoy taking a motorcycle or a scooter tour in India. India is a soulful, soul-stirring country, overflowing with cultural treasures, spiritual wonder, and natural beauty. A wondrous land of crowded mega cities, Himalayan monasteries, and ancient fishing villages, India sweeps you up in a confounding and beautiful tide of humanity. Float along Kerala's famous backwaters, take a camel ride through Rajasthan, or find peace at the holy Ganges. And whether you drink chai (tea) from the source in Munnar, or savor Marwari cuisine in Jaipur, the land of spices and its remarkable people will linger long in your memory.

 

Our guided Royal Enfield motorcycle and scooter tours in India are not only giving you the opportunity to explore the land of remarkable diversity on two wheels, but they also allow you to do that on the legendary Royal Enfield motorcycles. An experience that will ignite your curiosity, shake your senses and warm your soul.

 

For more information click here

 

 

 

 

While on business travel in Germany recently, I managed to meet up with the International Fellowship of Motorcycling Rotarians via a stateside member of the Rotary Club of Motorcycling Rotarians (an eClub). This ride was organized by Dr. Dirk Jensinghaus, our international IFMR president, so I felt particularly fortunate (and welcomed!) The group was mostly French riders with a few Germans. My limited high-school German and college French is pretty rusty but we did just fine with some translation help by Dirk and Pascal in the group. 

The ride down from Darmstadt on my rented BMW F800GT took a couple hours in the rain. About 30km away from my hotel, my 10 year old Daytona boots informed me they were no longer waterproof. Fortunately my Aerostich and triple-digit raingloves kept the rest of me dry enough. My iPhone on its RAM handlebar mount talked GPS to me through my Sena 10c Pro and worked well enough except for when a raindrop hit the screen directly and acted like a capacitive touch. This required me to tap it once to see my map again, and stop once to navigate back to my map display. More on this later.

 

Etape 2 : Sarreguemines – La Petite Pierre : (67 km, 1:30 St.) 9:30 – 11h00

Our second stage of riding included winding rural roads between farming towns and through forests. We did stop at one point for Pascal to point out a crystal factory. This region is famous for its crystal.

Kleine Pause in La-Petite-Pierre (11:00 – 11:30)

Based on when I set out from Darmstadt that morning, I would have loved to see a coffee stop earlier- so when we finally arrived at Brasserie Tivoli for libations including coffee and hot cocoa, I was very happy to warm up a little. It was also a great opportunity to get better acquainted with my clubmates and pass around the book I’d brought with as a gift for my 19-yr old. It’s a copy of “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance”, now signed by motorcyclists from all over the world. Though it’s materially modest, I think it’s a pretty good birthday gift for a 19-yr old just starting an adult life. Coincidentally, the author Robert Pirsig had just passed away a week prior, at the grand old age of 88 yrs. He was a fellow Minnesotan and Golden Gopher like me, and of course a motorcyclist. Godspeed, Dr. Pirsig.

Etape 3 : La Petite-Pierre – Le Donon (72 km, 1:30 St) : 11h30 – 13h00

The highlight I remember of this stage is passing through Graufthal and seeing the houses cut directly into the living stone of the cliffs. We also rode to the top of Rocher du Dabo, a castle on a hill that provided an excellent view of fog and rain. Visibility was limited but it was still a cool place to see.

Etape 4 : Repas / Mittagessen

The lunch stop was fabulous, and a hot meal on a cold wet day was most welcome. Our famous chef Cyril Strub happens to be a fellow motorcyclist. He and his wife operate “Black Pudding & Co” together. They met in her homeland Scotland, and moved together to France where we now found them at Le Kiboki. I’ve been told that Rotary motorcycling events are judged in part by the quality of the food. This large French meal certainly met the high standard with wine, several grilled meats, fresh salad, breads, dessert and of course espresso.

Etape 5 : Retour au choix, Rückfahrt je nach Wunsch ab 15 :00 oder 16 :00

After lunch, a few of our party split off to more direct ways home, while I headed back toward Saarbrucken with my German hosts. I sat out the rain and received some dry socks from Dirk, then headed back toward Darmstadt after it became apparent the rain wasn’t letting up. During our final stop I’d noticed one of four the rubber feet on my RAM X-Grip had departed the bike somewhere. I thought it would be okay- and put my phone in a plastic bag so the raindrops wouldn’t disturb the GPS. Unfortunately, while 3 out of 4 ain’t bad, it ain’t good either when it’s rubber feet on the RAM X-Grip. My iPhone left the bike at about 130kph on the autobahn, 40km outside Saarbrucken. I quickly decided that stopping for a black iPhone on the autobahn at night in the rain was a dumber idea than continuing without it. Fortunately I remembered the rest of the way back to my hotel in Darmstadt, and lived to figure out how to deal without a phone while traveling. That part I don’t recommend. Thanks Rotary! It was a memorable ride.


 
 
Ryujin Otsurihasi Bridge with Shigeru-san
 
Editing video takes so long… last month I enjoyed my first ride (but hopefully not last) in Japan. My friend and former colleague Shigeru-san was so kind as to offer playing tour guide for me on my recent business trip to Mito, Japan. It’s about 2 hours northeast of Tokyo. I rented a bike from a national network he recommended: Rental819. They required I arrive and be traveling with a native Japanese speaker, which was fortunate because I’m basically illiterate there. The bike I chose was a Harley Davidson Street 750, made in India. Why? Well, Shigeru rides a Kawasaki W800, and it seemed the HD would be well-matched. The bike worked fine, but the seat was painfully uncomfortable, and there was nothing inspiring about the rest of the bike. I like the irony of riding an Indian-made Harley in Japan. Lesson learned. Japan has tiered licensing, and bikes rate in classes P1 – P5. Scooters are P1, and literbikes are P5, so the P4 class HD was slightly less expensive than full-size bikes I’m used to. For reference, the other bike at Mito (again, way outside Tokyo with limited selection) was a Honda CB400. I’m sure I would have been happy on the CB because I’ve really loved all my Hondas and 400cc is more than enough for the riding we did. Here’s the route Shigeru-san graciously planned for us:
 
 
Day 1, Sunday, was very hot and humid. We encountered a ton of traffic as we neared the shogun temple at Nikko Toshogu, and had to stop along the way to rehydrate and cool down. After our convenience store stop, Shigeru-san had difficulty restarting his air-cooled W800. This delayed us a little, and we ended up splitting lanes along the curb (see video) to avoid an overheating encore before lunch and the temple. This was a holiday weekend in Japan, explaining availability of a Sunday-Monday ride. After a relaxing and worthwhile visit to the temple, we headed straight to the night’s lodging at a traditional onsen-style hotel, Pension Lakes Nikko. The hotel called Shigeru-san while we were at the temple to tell him we needed to arrive soon to avoid missing dinner. Enough said! The ride there was short, mercifully cooler than the morning, and included the Irohazaka winding road. Switchbacks were a great way to finish the riding day.
 
 
We returned down the switchbacks carefully. It was a beautiful ride even in the rain. This area is popular with sportbikers but traffic was far lighter on Monday. After a mid-morning coffee break and excellent roadside ramen stop, we spent a couple hours at the Honda Museum in Motegi. I could have spent all day. We didn’t even visit the race track but could hear high-performance motors screaming in the distance through the wooded hills and curves. My rental HD was due back in the evening, so we needed to move on to the second stop, Ryujin Otsurihasi suspension bridge. This is not a vehicle bridge, but famous among hikers and bungee-jumpers for scenic views. We did not jump : ) but were content to watch several other daredevils. Here’s the video of the trip, 13 1/2 minutes in total.
 
When I go back, I’d like to ride Hokkaido. Shigeru-san has a trip planned there next spring, and I’ve heard it’s motorcycle paradise. The northern island does experience winter though- so if you go- I’ve heard the month of May is about the best. Finally, the weekend after my business trip there, I had a grand sendoff from the rest of my former training colleagues there: Nitanai-san and Horii-san joined us for lunch at the Haneda airport. See you next time, my friends!
 

 
Reprinted with permission, Liz Jansen 
lizjansen.com posted April 5, 2019
https://lizjansen.com/10-spring-motorcycle-hazards-and-how-to-manage-them/
 

As eager as we are to get out for the first ride of the season, it’s important to prepare for unique spring motorcycle hazards.

Trudy and I went for our first ride last week. It was an early start but she needed routine maintenance beyond my repertoire. We’ve got travel plans for later this month so the work had to happen. We lucked out with a beautiful sunny day (sandwiched between two snow days) for the ninety-minute cross-country ride to my local Triumph dealer.

I wasn’t as ready as I would have preferred so I stayed away from traffic and rode more deliberately, aware of what I was dealing with.

 
10 Spring Motorcycle Hazards
  1. Automobile drivers. They haven’t had to share the road with motorcycles for four months. Add in their general inattentiveness and distractions and it’s a recipe for trouble. Give yourself plenty of space, watch other road users closely, and make yourself as visible as possible. Assume they don’t see you.
This article is published with the permission of RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel Magazine. It is not for sale or redistribution. RoadRUNNER is a bimonthly motorcycle touring magazine packed with exciting travel articles, splendid photography, and maps. Subscriptions are available online, or by calling (866) 343-7623.
February 8, 2019 -- Written by Heather Oliver
 

Talk to any motorcyclist and you’re likely to hear how they love the exhilarating feeling of freedom they get while riding. The feel of the wind, the intensity of the smells in the air, the vibrant views that come at you as if you’re wearing 3D glasses …

Even still, there are some people who remain unconvinced about the joys of riding—whether it’s procrastination, fear, or disinterest—they just can’t or won’t see the proverbial light.

If your enthusiasm for motorcycles has yet to persuade someone to learn to ride, start riding again, or to at least accept your passion for motorcycling, perhaps science can. Time to rehash the study done by Ryuta Kawashima in Tokyo (in conjunction with Yamaha). It makes an impressive case for riding. Yes, car drivers, we’re rubbing it in—and it never gets old!

Riding Motorcycles Daily Improves Cognitive Functioning

Who doesn’t want to be better at problem-solving and carrying out complex tasks? I don’t know about you, but I’m all for increased mental abilities. Maybe if I ride a motorcycle enough, I’ll finally be able to move things with my mind. Now there’s motivation! Does it still count if you’re on the back? The study didn’t cover that one …

 

Higher Levels of Concentration

If you ever hope to bend a spoon with your mind, then you should ride a motorcycle every chance you get. Seriously though, this one makes perfect sense. It takes much more concentration to ride a motorcycle than it does to drive a car. From shifting and stopping, counter-steering, to cornering, negotiating curves, and avoiding hazards on the road—your mind stays in high gear because you are so in tuned to your surroundings. Besides, doesn’t everyone have at least a teensy-weensy desire to be James Bond (or an Alex Parrish from Quanitco)? As a motorcyclist, you must be daring and quick on your feet—very 007-like.

Reduced Stress Levels

A recent study by the American Psychological Association (APA) found that individuals in the U.S. are consistently feeling stress levels of at least a 4.7 on a scale of 1-10, and that stress is directly affecting our health. Apparently, we’re all anxious, angry, or tired—perhaps that explains road rage! Yet another reason to ride. When was the last time you came across someone who was mad or stressed out because they were riding a motorcycle?

 

 

   Planning A Successful IFMR Ride
   Bob Shriner - Master Ride Guide
   IFMR-NA Past President 2010 - 2013
I'm often asked for guidance in planning an IFMR event to get the most participation and rider enjoyment. Here are a few things I've learned from experience.
 
Usually 2-3 months is needed to get a weekend event onto people's calendars and let them make plans to attend. Longer events need even more lead time.
 
Start planning well in advance. Think of some likely routes and possible dates. Aim for a route that will be interesting and enjoyable to riders and their passengers. Don't make it too long – about 200 miles of twisty roads will take about six hours of riding time, about as much as most passengers can endure. Anything more than 220 miles of twisty roads will produce complaints from passengers. Plan to start at 9 AM and be back by about 5 PM. If necessary, you can push the start time up to 8:30 but not much earlier. If you're lucky and complete the ride before 5 PM, it will give everyone time for more face- to-face fellowship together after the ride.
 
Allow about 2½ hours for lunch and pit stops en-route. You may think you can get the group moving in 10-15 minutes after making a 'short pit stop'; but you’ll find that it's VERY hard to get a group moving again in less than 25-30 minutes. Even a 'quick lunch' with a group usually takes more than an hour, so assume it will take an hour and a half.
 
Make your first pit stop no more than one hour from the start. Remember, many will have been tanking up on coffee shortly before the start and will need to stop in about an hour. Plan on two pit stops after lunch. Include a couple of special attractions along the way, if possible. Allow plenty of time for stops and fellowship along the route. Try to arrange 'meet & greet' events with local Rotary clubs, etc.
 
Once you have a tentative decision on the likely route, then pick a date. Try to avoid dates with big local sports events or other events that will fill up area lodging places.
 
Once you have a date, start contacting lodges/motels that you'll need to check availability and get written quotes for your group. Ask for a few more rooms than you think you'll need, with agreement to release unreserved rooms 3-4 weeks before the actual date of use but with the group rate still available after the date if vacancies are still available. That's common practice.
 
As soon as you have pinned down the dates, the route, and the lodging details, put together and distribute an announcement flyer with details. The sooner the better!
 
Finally, before the event, do a pre-run to check the road conditions, travel times, and other details. Make changes as needed based on the pre-run. You'll end up with a better event, and you'll have more fun yourself.
 
 

On September 7-8, 2018, Scott Nelson of Oakland Rotary #3 rode his Triumph motorcycle in the 2018 No Polio! Rally. Bob and Patti Mutchler (Folsom Rotary members) hosted the pre/post Friday & Saturday BBQ dinners at their home, prepared to perfection by rally chef David Hatfield. Allan Pratt, Our Rallymaster, mapped a Saturday 8-hour ride with route alternatives and bonus-point opportunities on beautiful backroads.

Other participants included Mario Winkelman, Neil Cook, Nancy Lefcourt, Peter Perrin, and Katherine Copeland, member of the Vancouver BC Rotary club. Notably, Katherine drove the farthest to participate, nearly raised the highest donations, and passed her motorcycle license test the day she departed for this rally.

Bob’s goal for this 10th annual NoPolio! Rally was $10,000. As of Sept. 9th, we went over, totaling $16,905 in donations! This event is a charity fund raiser: donations raise money and awareness for PolioPlus and for fighting polio worldwide. Since 2008, we have raised more than $110,000.00 towards this goal from the motorcycle community alone. More details about the rally series can be found at http://nopolio.org/.

 


 
 
It's official!!! There is a new Rotary Club in town! Welcome new Rotarians to the awesome world of Rotary!!

Join us online as we celebrate being an officially Chartered Rotary Club!!!
Rotary Club of Motorcycling Rotarians
See you there!

 

 

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The North American chapter of IFMR (IFMR-NA) is pleased to nominate PDG Raymond E. Plue, DVM, as candidate for International President of IFMR for the term 2015-2018. Raymond served as President of the North American chapter of IFMR 2007-2010 and as Governor of Rotary District 6080 2010-2011. He currently serves as chairman of the IFMR-NA Council of Governors, which he helped found in 2011, and as Dean of the District 6080 Rotary Leadership Academy. He also continues to serve in a number of other key leadership roles in Rotary District 6080 and beyond.