A couple of updates for both our current members and new incoming members!
 
For existing IFMR-NA Members:  For current members paying annual renewal dues, please respond to the invoice that is sent to you.  You can also log in to your account to check your account statement and balance.
 
For NEW IFMR-NA Members ONLY:  Click on "JOIN IFMR-NA!"  in the menu bar above that will take you to the NEW Member information page.  Or you can also click here to go directly to the new membership form.

 
 

The trip started in 1996.  Katie and I were on a full service motorcycle tour in the Alps and Italy.  The “best” Alpine pass for that tour was Gross Glockner in Austria.  It snowed and the pass was closed when we got there.  I vowed to return!  In 2018, we did!

Katie and I started planning this in 2017.  I contacted Ayres Adventures, with whom we had done 2 full service motorcycle tours before.  I asked if they could help set up a self guided tour.  They were happy to help.  I told them the parameters: Ride Gross Glockner pass, Stelvio pass, the Dolomites; 10 days of riding; max 200 miles per day; at least 2 nights at each stop; 3 star hotels; start and finish in Munich.  Ayres arranged for the rental of the motorcycles (2 BMW RTs), the hotels and provided suggested routes and waypoints for the 10 days of riding.

Riding with Larie and Katie Trippet were Jim Conley and Rosie Painter.

We arrived in Munich, Germany 2 days early and visited the BMW World museum among other sightseeing.  The BMW R1200 RTs were delivered to the hotel on the afternoon before we started riding.  We packed the side cases and were off in the morning.  The suitcases stayed at the hotel.

The delivery of the bikes was not without a scary moment.  I chose the red bike.  The rental guy couldn’t find the actual key, but the bike would start.  He decided that the electronic key was locked in the trunk, along with the trunk key!.  He drove back to his home to retrieve backup keys for the trunk.  I took the bike to the underground parking garage.  There the bike would not start, so I assumed the key was in his van.  He came back about 2 hours later with about 100 trunk keys.  On the 95th try, we found a key that worked, and yep, that is where the key was.

Day 1 took us over Gross Glockner pass.  A beautiful day.  We went up to the high point named Edelweiss Spitze for a spectacular view. On the way to Gross Glockner, we stopped for a snack at the home of fellow motorcycling Rotarian, Anton Mosshammer.  A great way to visit with the “locals” while having Rotary and motorcycling as our common bond.  Anton is willing and enthusiastic about helping others organize motorcycle tours in the region.We ended the day in Lienz, Austria.  In the hotel I found beer in a vending machine in the lobby!

Day 2 was a loop to the east of Lienz.  Beautiful mountain riding with several minor passes.  The highlight was Lake Millstatt for a lunch stop. In Lienz, motorcycling Rotarian Pilli and Krista von Prancke joined us for dinner and for the ride the next day to Bolzano.  Very nice people.

Day 3 took us from Lienz to Bolzano, Italy via several major passes.  We stopped for coffee at beautiful Lake Misurina.  Unfortunately we got separated from Pilli and Krista.  We made it to the top of Passo di Falzarego.  I think I made a wrong turn and we missed Passo di Giao.  That may have been a blessing.  Pilli and Krista ran into a heavy thundershower, while we avoided it.  We also did Passo di Pordoi.

Day 4 was a loop through the heart of the Dolomites.  We circled the Sella Group of mountains.

Day 5 the girls decided to take a day off the bikes.  Jim and I went on a loop which included Mendel pass.  It was to the west of Bolzano.  We avoided some thundershowers.  The weather had cooled down a bit from when we started.

Day 6 was the ride from Bolzano to Gravedona on Lake Como in Italy.  It was to be our day to go over the famous Passo di Stelvio.  Due to the cooler weather, the altitude of Stelvio and the thunderstorms, there was a threat of ice on the road up high.  Fortunately we were in touch with 2 more motorcycling Rotarians who confirmed this.  Carlo Linetti joined us in the morning to guide us on an alternate route.  We had opportunity to travel Stelvio later. On the way, we were joined by Gino, another motorcycling Rotarian. While following them, we became further immersed in the motorcycling habits of the Europeans.  We had  noticed that they pass cars pretty much any time they like, even with oncoming traffic!  The cars seem to expect this and there didn’t seem to be any close calls.  I was obviously very conservative….until today, following Carlo and Gino! Our route took us north and west through Switzerland and then on to Lake Como.  We had a nice lunch stop by a lake accompanied by great conversation!  Carlo had to leave after lunch because he had a presentation to give that night.  He was a very fast rider and has been on the track with Jorge Lorenzo, on of Ducatis MotoGP racers!!  He was going to travel about 90 miles in 60 minutes! GPSs are wonderful devices.  But you need to always be alert.  It is a computer and only knows “shortest distance” or “fastest route”   And you never know the parameters it is using to calculate the route.  Here is the “road” it wanted me to turn down to get to our hotel:

That is about 6 to 8 ft wide!  Thankfully it recalculated a better route and we got to the hotel safely!  Also, while leading Pilli and Krista earlier, the GPS lead me through a pedestrian-only area.  Boy, did I feel out of place.

Day 7 was a free/rest day at Lake Como.  We all decided to take the ferry across Lake Como to Bellagio and then to Varenna.  In both places we toured villas, gardens and lots of high end shops.  I did find a restaurant serving “craft beer”.  However, nothing like we have here in the good old USA!  I am spoiled!

Day 8 was a ride from Lake Como to Pfunds, Austria.  We had a route planned to go over Stelvio and we took that route.  Before Stelvio was Gavia pass.  VERY narrow road with VERY sharp switchbacks, 2 way traffic and no guardrails.  To be honest, I was a bit freaked out, but made it successfully.  After Gavia Pass, we came to Stelvio Pass.  There are 3 roads up to Stelvio pass: 1 from Italy, 1 from Austria and 1 from Switzerland.  We arrived on the road up from Italy.  The famous side is the Austria side.  It has 50 switchbacks and you can see most of them from the top.  That is the famous picture!

We stayed at the top for a bit and we could see way down the road there was a truck or a bus that was blocking one of the switchbacks.  Dead stop traffic was growing.  After ½ hour, there was no budging of the blocking vehicle.  We decided to go down the Switzerland side.  A bit of a disappointment at the time.

Day 9 was to be a loop ride from Pfunds to go over several major passes: Jaufenpass and Timmelsjoch.  Probably wonderful passes!  But Jim suggested we go back to Stelvio, since we were close enough.  Great choice!  The girls decided to take a day off the bikes.  Riding the twisty roads with no luggage and no passenger is quite a bit more relaxing.  We went up and then down the famous 50 switchbacks on the Austria side with minimal traffic.  Great day!!  Jim found us a great lunch spot part way down the pass. The European motorcycle riders in the Alps are VERY fast.  Jim and I decided if we went as fast as we could, we would never keep up with their slowest rider.  Here is another vehicle we saw going up Stelvio, from Great Britain:

Which brings us to day 10, our last day on the bikes.  We are riding from Pfunds Austria back to Munich.  We had some very slight drizzles on earlier days, but today we had intermittent light, rain almost all day.  We made a brief stop at a very large cathedral and then on to Ludwig’s castle.  No pictures allowed inside the castle.  It was huge and fascinating.  Walt Disney used this castle as the model for his castle at the original Disneyland.

We arrived back at the same hotel in Munich rather tired after a long day.  We unloaded the bikes and they were picked up at about 9pm by the rental company.  Everything was in order.  1188 miles!!

Now we start our trip to the Amalfi coast!!  

The next day was a private boat tour of the Amalfi coast.  Very relaxing and great views.  We stopped at a restaurant for lunch that you can only get to by water.  We swam a bit.  The salty water made us float very easily.

That night we had a dinner high up on the mountain at a restaurant with a great view.  Many courses of food served family (sharing) style.  Unlimited wine, too!

   Planning A Successful IFMR Ride
   Bob Shriner - Master Ride Guide
   IFMR-NA Past President 2010 - 2013
I'm often asked for guidance in planning an IFMR event to get the most participation and rider enjoyment. Here are a few things I've learned from experience.
 
Usually 2-3 months is needed to get a weekend event onto people's calendars and let them make plans to attend. Longer events need even more lead time.
 
Start planning well in advance. Think of some likely routes and possible dates. Aim for a route that will be interesting and enjoyable to riders and their passengers. Don't make it too long – about 200 miles of twisty roads will take about six hours of riding time, about as much as most passengers can endure. Anything more than 220 miles of twisty roads will produce complaints from passengers. Plan to start at 9 AM and be back by about 5 PM. If necessary, you can push the start time up to 8:30 but not much earlier. If you're lucky and complete the ride before 5 PM, it will give everyone time for more face- to-face fellowship together after the ride.
 
Allow about 2½ hours for lunch and pit stops en-route. You may think you can get the group moving in 10-15 minutes after making a 'short pit stop'; but you’ll find that it's VERY hard to get a group moving again in less than 25-30 minutes. Even a 'quick lunch' with a group usually takes more than an hour, so assume it will take an hour and a half.
 
Make your first pit stop no more than one hour from the start. Remember, many will have been tanking up on coffee shortly before the start and will need to stop in about an hour. Plan on two pit stops after lunch. Include a couple of special attractions along the way, if possible. Allow plenty of time for stops and fellowship along the route. Try to arrange 'meet & greet' events with local Rotary clubs, etc.
 
Once you have a tentative decision on the likely route, then pick a date. Try to avoid dates with big local sports events or other events that will fill up area lodging places.
 
Once you have a date, start contacting lodges/motels that you'll need to check availability and get written quotes for your group. Ask for a few more rooms than you think you'll need, with agreement to release unreserved rooms 3-4 weeks before the actual date of use but with the group rate still available after the date if vacancies are still available. That's common practice.
 
As soon as you have pinned down the dates, the route, and the lodging details, put together and distribute an announcement flyer with details. The sooner the better!
 
Finally, before the event, do a pre-run to check the road conditions, travel times, and other details. Make changes as needed based on the pre-run. You'll end up with a better event, and you'll have more fun yourself.
 
 

On September 7-8, 2018, Scott Nelson of Oakland Rotary #3 rode his Triumph motorcycle in the 2018 No Polio! Rally. Bob and Patti Mutchler (Folsom Rotary members) hosted the pre/post Friday & Saturday BBQ dinners at their home, prepared to perfection by rally chef David Hatfield. Allan Pratt, Our Rallymaster, mapped a Saturday 8-hour ride with route alternatives and bonus-point opportunities on beautiful backroads.

Other participants included Mario Winkelman, Neil Cook, Nancy Lefcourt, Peter Perrin, and Katherine Copeland, member of the Vancouver BC Rotary club. Notably, Katherine drove the farthest to participate, nearly raised the highest donations, and passed her motorcycle license test the day she departed for this rally.

Bob’s goal for this 10th annual NoPolio! Rally was $10,000. As of Sept. 9th, we went over, totaling $16,905 in donations! This event is a charity fund raiser: donations raise money and awareness for PolioPlus and for fighting polio worldwide. Since 2008, we have raised more than $110,000.00 towards this goal from the motorcycle community alone. More details about the rally series can be found at http://nopolio.org/.

 


 
 
 
Ride Arkansas, Ozark & Ouachita Mountains
Friday, September 14 – Arrive
Saturday, September 15 – Ride
Sunday, September 16 – Additional Arkansas Rides or Return Home
 
Hotel Accommodations: Best Western Inn of the Ozarks
207 W Van Buren
Eureka Springs, AR
(479) 253-9768
Room Block Name:  IFMR-Motorcycle
Room Rate:  $109

 

Ride Mt. Magazine - the highest mountain in Arkansas

Ride the famous Pig Trail and Arkansas Scenic 7 Byway (#7)

273 Total Miles

Cross the Arkansas River to Rocky Mountain Headwaters and the Pathway of the Santa Fe Trail in Kansas and Colorado

Cross the Buffalo National River

Highlighted map and Arkansas Motorcycle Rides Map Book for each rider

Big breakfast then kickstands up at 8:30am on September 15 

For more information contact Raymond E Plue at (573) 823-8899 or via email

 


 

 
President Doug Cole, of the Australian Chapter has had a Committee earnestly working on a new Australian International Ride.

Today we are commencing advertising of our 'AIR2020' International Ride, for October 2020.

Numbers are not limited at the moment, but I consider we should employ the theory of ' first come, best dressed'.  We had 57 participants to the Nov 2017 'AIR17 International Ride.

We plan for AIR2020 to be bigger and better than AIR17, we have filtered all the Feedback from AIR17 and we hope to improve the Ride and supply all the issues the International and Australian Members have requested.
 
Check out the video by clicking here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Download the FLYER and the MAP
 

 
 
 
It's official!!! There is a new Rotary Club in town! Welcome new Rotarians to the awesome world of Rotary!!

Join us online as we celebrate being an officially Chartered Rotary Club!!!
Rotary Club of Motorcycling Rotarians
See you there!

 

Join the meeting online from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/237350826
Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll): +14086380968,237350826# or +16465588656,237350826#

Or Telephone:
Dial: +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll) or +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 237 350 826

 

 

The Indian Himalayas is unlike anywhere else on Earth, a rich tapestry of dramatic scenery and fascinating cultural diversity. En route of this motorcycle tour across the Himalayas you will be awe-struck by the rugged peaks of the Himalayas, you will sip tea in a hill station before hopping back on your motorcycle and ride to the world highest road, you will experience the rush of river crossing by your motorcycle and find inner peace at a yoga retreat.

 

On this tour you will also experiences crossing a couple of the highest mountain passes in the world, an experience that worth doing on its own, not to mention doing it on the legendary Royal Enfield Motorcycle

 

Cross India Challenge is a series of guided motorcycle and scooter tours across the vast Indian territories, and although we have included everything you need into our tour packages, but traveling always require prior planning. Here you will find some further details that will help you plan your next adventure around India.

 

Click Here for More Information  or Facebook

 

 


 
The North American chapter of IFMR (IFMR-NA) is pleased to nominate PDG Raymond E. Plue, DVM, as candidate for International President of IFMR for the term 2015-2018. Raymond served as President of the North American chapter of IFMR 2007-2010 and as Governor of Rotary District 6080 2010-2011. He currently serves as chairman of the IFMR-NA Council of Governors, which he helped found in 2011, and as Dean of the District 6080 Rotary Leadership Academy. He also continues to serve in a number of other key leadership roles in Rotary District 6080 and beyond.